+
We routinely rotate all of the costumes & textiles we have on display to protect them from fading and aging in the light. For the 1850s pioneer case, our collections team is prepping this plaid silk dress as an example of a “Sunday best” or special occasion dress that an early setter could have owned. In the pocket our collections team found a small newspaper clipping with two jokes. The paper isn’t as brittle as it would be if it dated back all the way to the period of the dress, but our Costume & Textiles Specialist would guess it is at least 50 years old. 
We routinely rotate all of the costumes & textiles we have on display to protect them from fading and aging in the light. For the 1850s pioneer case, our collections team is prepping this plaid silk dress as an example of a “Sunday best” or special occasion dress that an early setter could have owned. In the pocket our collections team found a small newspaper clipping with two jokes. The paper isn’t as brittle as it would be if it dated back all the way to the period of the dress, but our Costume & Textiles Specialist would guess it is at least 50 years old. 
+
Here are latex molds of Bobo’s ears. Don’t know who Bobo is? Find out here. We have no idea where these came from but they have been in our collection’s office for years.
+
Our Registrar, Kristin, got to hold the Lombardi Trophy at last night’s Championship Night at Key Arena. 
+
Nordy Tour: Stop 1
Before Nordy entered our collection, the toy traveled around Seattle to see its favorite spots one last time. Here’s Nordy at Golden Gardens. Photo by Allison Loveland.
Don’t know who Nordy is? Here’s some background on this plush toy.
+
Here’s two pairs of spats that were recently worked on in our collection. Spats, aka “spatterdashes” or spatter guards are worn over shoes and cover the instep and the ankle. The started as a functional piece of clothing (protecting shoes and stockings in bad weather), but also became a fashionable accessory.  In use mainly from the late 19th century to the 1920s.
1959.1678.1: Black spats with four buttons down outside of ankle and strap with buckle under the shoe. Belonged to Territorial Governor Watson Squire. c. 1900.
1963.2941.23 : Pair of black wool spats which donor Miss Anna Belle Shaw wore at the U. of W. in 1919. Black with six buttons up the side. 1919.
Here’s two pairs of spats that were recently worked on in our collection. Spats, aka “spatterdashes” or spatter guards are worn over shoes and cover the instep and the ankle. The started as a functional piece of clothing (protecting shoes and stockings in bad weather), but also became a fashionable accessory.  In use mainly from the late 19th century to the 1920s.
1959.1678.1: Black spats with four buttons down outside of ankle and strap with buckle under the shoe. Belonged to Territorial Governor Watson Squire. c. 1900.
1963.2941.23 : Pair of black wool spats which donor Miss Anna Belle Shaw wore at the U. of W. in 1919. Black with six buttons up the side. 1919.
+
Blue and white striped coveralls from the 1930s.
Belonged to Maurice Hannafin, a mechanic and auto repairman in Seattle 1922 to about 1960.  In 1930 worked for S.L. Savidge, Inc., distributor of Hupmobile and Pierce Arrow.
Many of the items in our clothing collection are fashionable, pretty things where rips or stains can be a big problem. But here is a case where the dirt and tears is part of the story! Even though they are worn and stained, they were still carefully patched and mended. Proof that sturdy work clothing was valuable, particularly during the Great Depression.
Blue and white striped coveralls from the 1930s.
Belonged to Maurice Hannafin, a mechanic and auto repairman in Seattle 1922 to about 1960.  In 1930 worked for S.L. Savidge, Inc., distributor of Hupmobile and Pierce Arrow.
Many of the items in our clothing collection are fashionable, pretty things where rips or stains can be a big problem. But here is a case where the dirt and tears is part of the story! Even though they are worn and stained, they were still carefully patched and mended. Proof that sturdy work clothing was valuable, particularly during the Great Depression.
Blue and white striped coveralls from the 1930s.
Belonged to Maurice Hannafin, a mechanic and auto repairman in Seattle 1922 to about 1960.  In 1930 worked for S.L. Savidge, Inc., distributor of Hupmobile and Pierce Arrow.
Many of the items in our clothing collection are fashionable, pretty things where rips or stains can be a big problem. But here is a case where the dirt and tears is part of the story! Even though they are worn and stained, they were still carefully patched and mended. Proof that sturdy work clothing was valuable, particularly during the Great Depression.
+
The Chatham Anchor is here! A chance discovery six years ago by diver Doug Monk has turned into an underwater forensic mystery to identify the history behind a 1,400 pound iron anchor discovered in the depths of Puget Sound. It’s now on display in our atrium until Friday!
Join public historian Scott Grimm as he lays out the case claiming this is indeed the 222-year-old Chatham anchor and explores the challenges of authentication and preservation of historic artifacts tonight! Get your tickets here.
+
Check out this skeet shooting sweater owned by Victor Denny (grandson of Louisa and David) and made by the Seattle knitting company Sportcraft. Circa 1940s. 
Check out this skeet shooting sweater owned by Victor Denny (grandson of Louisa and David) and made by the Seattle knitting company Sportcraft. Circa 1940s. 
+
Have you seen the HBO movie, The Normal Heart? Did you know that it is based off of a 1985 play of the same name? In 1986, the Pioneer Square Theater put on a production of The Normal Heart & MOHAI recently received the original program from this production (which appears above). This program was donated by Bonnie Rae Nygren through the Revealing Queer Collections Initiative. Here Bonnie tells the story of the program:
"The Pioneer Square Theater production of The Normal Heart was riveting. I believe it was the west coast premiere of this play. I saw the PST production twice. I was so impressed and moved by the first viewing that I went a second time. A friend and I were in line and we were asked if, in exchange for seats, we would be willing to hand out programs, act as ushers and help out with intermission. Of course, I was thrilled to not only have another chance to see the production, but to in some small way contribute. I think there may have been many like myself who were asked to be “helpers”. I don’t think there was a large or full-time staff at the theater. If my memory serves me, there was a scene in the play that involved a carton of real milk exploding on the stage. It made the scene all the more memorable and something about it made you really FEEL this story.
I DID see the HBO movie and was also very moved by that. It brought me back to that time in the 80’s when we lost so many in our community. So much sadness and helplessness back then. So grateful to people like Larry Kramer. He’s MY hero.”
+
Do you remember Nordy? This plush toy was a promotional piece for Nordstrom’s Department Store. It was meant to represent a shoehorn, given out by the Nordstrom children’s shoe department when it opened, and periodically since then. The donor, Allison Loveland, purchased the toy online and then took it around Seattle for a photo shoot. Allison was a MOHAI employee who worked on the collections move project from 2011-2013. Stay tuned for the Nordy tour!