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For many years, Seattle’s industries closed on Labor Day, and trade union members marched in the annual Labor Day parade. In 1918, the United States’ armed forces were still fighting in Europe. Union members serving at forts and naval stations in the Seattle area marched in the parade in uniform. The Seattle Times reported that 40,000 union members were expected to take part in the day’s activities .
This photo shows Seattle’s annual Labor Day parade in 1918 as it passes the County-City Building. A group of sailors marches beside a Red Cross float.
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This poem is by Collin LeBeau who was a participant in our Teen Poetry Program held in partnership with the Seattle Public Libraries! In this program, we explored captivating images from our archives and created poems using vintage typewriters. This poem was inspired by a photo from the 1950s depicting the night sky over downtown Seattle.
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To celebrate the 1st week of school, we’re throwing back to the classroom of yesteryear. This ca. 1905 photo shows the classroom at Yesler School, which was located near the intersection of 36th Avenue NE & NE 47th Street. ‪
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These shoes are dated to around 1960 and the mark on the sole says “Michele, Fifth Avenue, Paris, hand lasted.” The donor, Fay Suttles Olsen gave us around 20 pairs of women’s shoes of various styles. She was an artist who worked on window displays at The Bon Marche department store in Seattle. 
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A swirly, Art Nouveau print on a 1904 silk blouse from our collection.
A swirly, Art Nouveau print on a 1904 silk blouse from our collection.
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Join us on Saturday for skateboarding demos, giveaways & so much more at Innoskate!
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Who wore it better? On the right is a late 1880s dress that is now on display at MOHAI in the “Toklas & Singerman” case, representing a Seattle store window just before the Great Seattle Fire. We don’t know for sure that this dress has a Seattle connection, and it is a very high end fabric probably imported from Paris, but is conceivable—now that Washington was a state and the railroad was here—that a store in Seattle could procure this level of goods. And, in keeping with the Kim K. theme, this shape of this dress is a lot curvier than many of the tiny, thin 19th century dresses we have in our collection.
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We routinely rotate all of the costumes & textiles we have on display to protect them from fading and aging in the light. For the 1850s pioneer case, our collections team is prepping this plaid silk dress as an example of a “Sunday best” or special occasion dress that an early setter could have owned. In the pocket our collections team found a small newspaper clipping with two jokes. The paper isn’t as brittle as it would be if it dated back all the way to the period of the dress, but our Costume & Textiles Specialist would guess it is at least 50 years old. 
We routinely rotate all of the costumes & textiles we have on display to protect them from fading and aging in the light. For the 1850s pioneer case, our collections team is prepping this plaid silk dress as an example of a “Sunday best” or special occasion dress that an early setter could have owned. In the pocket our collections team found a small newspaper clipping with two jokes. The paper isn’t as brittle as it would be if it dated back all the way to the period of the dress, but our Costume & Textiles Specialist would guess it is at least 50 years old. 
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Here are latex molds of Bobo’s ears. Don’t know who Bobo is? Find out here. We have no idea where these came from but they have been in our collection’s office for years.
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Our Registrar, Kristin, got to hold the Lombardi Trophy at last night’s Championship Night at Key Arena.