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In 1899, the United States Congress passed legislation creating Mount Rainier National Park. While many early visitors arrived by train, it soon became park policy to build a system of automobile roads so that a majority of visitors could see the park without leaving their cars. In 1911, people could drive from Longmire Springs to Nisqually Glacier if they bought a permit from the park superintendent .
In this photo, taken around 1910, a visitor to Mount Rainier National Park sits in a Flanders automobile under the entrance gate at Longmire Springs. The speed limit in the park ranged from 6 to 15 miles per hour, and drivers had to honk their horns at each curve in the road to alert oncoming horses and automobiles.
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athousandlivesintherain:

My new favorite exhibit at #MOHAI #seattlesketcher

One visitor’s highlights of Drawn to Seattle
Seattle Places: Market Street in Ballard
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On this day in 1947, Northwest Airlines held a ceremony at Seattle’s Boeing Field marking their first flight to Asia. The plane, a propeller driven Douglas DC-4, carried 56 passengers.
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Local milliner John Eaton was inspired by the 1962 World’s Fair in Seattle when he made this towering creation (modeled by Seattle model Donna Rydberg). Calling the hat “Solar Phantasy,” he said the arches represented science (specifically the arches of the science pavilion—Now the Pacific Science Center—seen in the background), the flowers represented landscape of the fairgrounds, the feathers are reminiscent of the various fountains at the fair, and he put a diamond stud on one of the leaves as a reminder of the cost of the fair. Eaton’s shop, called “John Eaton, Of Course,” was at 509 Pine Street.
Seattle Places: Inside The Seattle Times
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Seattle Giants player batting in Dugdale Park, Seattle, ca. 1920
Seattle Places: The Olympic Sculpture Park
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Join us tomorrow as we celebrate Revealing Queer for Free First Thursday!